Annual Conference

Faculty Speakers/Workshops

Featured Speaker

Ashley Rhodes-Courter

Ashley Rhodes-Courter is the quintessential American success story. Born in 1985 to a single teen mother, by the age of 3 she was in Florida's foster care system where she spent almost ten years being shuttled between 14 homes-some quite abusive-before being adopted from a Children's Home at the age of twelve. Despite her ordeal, she excelled in school because she believed that, "my education was the one thing nobody could take from me." Early in her life she felt compelled to advocate for herself and the other children she lived with, particularly in the abusive foster homes.

Her efforts and academic achievements landed her Eckerd College's Trustee Scholarship-the school's most prestigious full-tuition award. She graduated with honors and ahead of schedule earning a double major in Communications and Theater and a double minor in Political Science and Psychology. Ashley then went on to earn a Master's Degree in Social Work from the University of Southern California.

During her undergraduate studies, she was one of 20 college students selected for the USA Today All-USA Academic Team and was named one of GLAMOUR Magazine's Top Ten College Women. She was also selected as one of the four Golden BRICK Award winners for outstanding advocacy for community change by DoSomething! As part of their campaign, she was featured on 25 million bags of Cool Ranch Doritos.

Workshops

Enabling More Data Driven Decision-making in Supervised Visitation

Data Changes Everything. As Social Services become more resource constrained and scrutinized, we must be able to save time and provide actionable insights for frontline social workers, case managers, and clinicians so they can improve day-by-day. By making small changes in how and which services are delivered to families and by knowing what works and what doesn't, we will enable providers to focus on things that really matter - spending more time serving customers.

It begins with Supervised Visitation, considered the gateway or entry point into other family social services. It is here where we begin to collect high-quality data on supervised visits to help social workers make more informed assessments and recommendations regarding the family's situation to safely enable reunification and reduce foster care placement durations. Automated visitation workflows (referrals, visit reports, unusual incidents, and billing) generate detailed reporting and analytics, which are provided back to social workers and providers, who then evaluate their efficiency and effectiveness and make improvements to the visitation process and experience.


This session will highlight how we're working to answer these questions based upon on a parent-child supervised visitation pilot based in Washington State using "Oliver", a software-as-a-service solution from Partners for Our Children as part of the University of Washington, School of Social Work.

For over 26 years, Abraham Ray has been involved in the strategy, development, and delivery of complex, global enterprise-wide, data-driven software-based solutions involving people, process, and technology at IBM / NASA, Motorola / IRIDIUM, Trilogy Software, Microsoft, and Nordstrom. He is passionate about building and leading teams and leveraging data, platforms, and software services to build experiences that users love and deliver value to stakeholders. His focus at Partners for Our Children includes the strategy, development and deployment of the "Oliver" social service management solution to connect children & families, service providers, social workers, evaluators, and funders to improve outcomes for customers served by the social service sector. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Mathematics from the University of Texas at El Paso.

Tech Safety for Survivors in a James Bond World

We are living in the world of James Bond. We have smart phones, watches and even glasses; a regular smorgasbord of affordable spy gear for today's consumers. Q always took his technological creations seriously, as saving James Bond was no laughing matter. With the influx of technology comes the harsh reality that stalking behaviors have a new environment to flourish. We must learn how to maneuver in this new reality of an ever changing technological world and just like Q, know that saving victims/survivors from "high tech terror" is no laughing matter. This workshop will explore the implications of technological safety for supervised visitation providers working within a domestic violence lens. We will explore safety planning for victims and staff, and discuss the technology available that makes stalking easy in today's "James Bond" inspired world.

Jennifer Garst has worked in supervised visitation for over 5 years, coming to this work with undergraduate and graduate degrees in Social Work from the University of Texas at Arlington. During these past 5 years, she has served as an intern, contract visitation supervisor, case manager and now Program Director of Faith & Liberty's Place (FLP), a program of The Family Place which is the largest comprehensive domestic violence agency in Dallas, TX. In addition to her work at FLP, she currently chairs the Dallas County Domestic Violence Awareness Coalition and is a member of the Supervised Visitation Network's training and technology committees. She has had the opportunity to present on multiple national webinars and has presented multiple times at the SVN annual conference. In the past year, she has also served as faculty for the 24 Hour Certificate training and has had the pleasure of teaching this curriculum around the country to new and existing visitation providers. Jennifer is passionate about working with victims of violence and enjoys exploring visitation work within this lens.

Sustaining the Movement via Succession Planning and Management

Having just turned 25, the Supervised Visitation Network and its members have experienced various transitions over the years. One important but often overlooked transition is that related to succession - the processes by which you prepare for, implement, and oversee ongoing changes to staff.

In order to sustain our supervised visitation and exchange movement, planning and managing succession needs to be a part of everyone's job. In a field where quality and professional staff are foundational to safe, neutral, and child-focused services, it is critical to ensure that "the right person for the right job" is available when needed.

This session will explore the processes of succession planning and management within the context of supervised visitation and exchange programs, and with a focus on sustaining our movement through a staffing lens for all types of providers (including for private providers, in the event that they can no longer deliver service).

Judy Newman MSW, RSW from Toronto, Ontario Canada is the manager of the Supervised Access Program, Ministry of the Attorney General which has over 100 site locations across the province. Judy oversees the funding contracts with the non-profit organizations hosting the supervised access services funded by the Ministry of the Attorney General and works with them to develop practice standards, policies and procedures and training. Judy was actively involved in the development of supervised access services before taking on her current position. Judy is a registered professional social worker who previously worked at the Office of the Children's Lawyer working with children and families involved in high conflict custody and access disputes conducting investigations and assisting children's counsel to represent the interests of children before the court. She is a field instructor and adjunct lecturer for the Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto and a field instructor for Ryerson University social work program and York University. She conducts research and has been on the board and executive of local and international non-profit organizations including the AFCC, AFCC-Ontario, SVN (Supervised Visitation Network) and the Toronto High Conflict Forum. She is also a frequent workshop presenter at professional conferences.

Maribeth Christensen was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario. She holds an Honours Bachelor of Social Work from Ryerson University, a Masters of Social Work from the University of Toronto (with a specialization in Social Justice and Diversity), and a Masters of Arts in Political Science (with a collaborative program in Women and Gender Studies) from the University of Toronto. Maribeth began her journey with the Ministry of the Attorney General's (MAG) Supervised Access Program (SAP) in 2008 as a placement student and returned to take on the role of program analyst in March 2011. In between, she worked for MAG's Accessibility Unit and for the Ministry of Community and Social Services as a policy analyst in the area of programs/services for adults with developmental disabilities. During her time with SAP, Maribeth helped the Program be the first across the Ontario government to achieve compliance with the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service, 2008; contributed to the development of e-learning modules and other training initiatives; chaired various committees (including most recently the "SAP 101 Video" working group); and has been an active member of the small but mighty ministry team that continues to manage and grow the Program to the benefit of all its stakeholders (children and their families in Ontario, local program staff, and the broader supervised access community). She joined the SVN Board as Secretary in 2016,and currently co-chairs the Technology Task Force.

Therapeutic Facilitated Visitation that is Built on Solution-Focused AND Trauma-Informed Approaches

This workshop will get back to the basics of visitation programs, showcasing the approach of integrating solution-focused and trauma-informed care philosophies. Built around the guiding principles of safety, trustworthiness, choice, collaboration, and empowerment, concepts and ideas presented can benefit administrative staff, monitors, judges, court personnel, and collaborative partners looking to strengthen visitation programs large and small.

With a major focus on shifting perspectives away from the visitation monitor's traditional role of "problem-solver" to the collaborative role of strength based partner, the use of clear communication and positive language to foster hope will be explored. Ideas around the basics of designing inviting and safe spaces, as well as parent/child bonding activities to minimize the impact of separation will also be discussed.

Michelle Federowicz, MSW , is the Vice President of Foster Care & Preventive Services for Gateway Longview, a child and family services agency with multiple locations throughout Western New York. A 2006 graduate of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work, Michelle began her career with the Agency in 2003 as a Foster Care and Adoption Specialist, working her way up to Supervisor followed by Director of the program. As Vice President, she is responsible for ensuring impactful outcomes of the department, and has been instrumental in facilitating a solution-focused and trauma-informed approach with over 50 community-based staff. Michelle is also an adjunct professor of psychology at Niagara Community College in Sanborn, New York.

The Three-Legged Stool - A Balanced Approach to Funding your Supervised Visitation Program

Funding for non profit supervised visitation program is often a challenging proposition, to say the least! The goal of this workshop is to help you understand how to build your budget with a balanced approach, not relying on any one funding source too heavily so your organization can weather changes in the funding atmosphere. The three-legged stool refers to identifying and cultivating three different funding streams that are equal to 33% of an agencies budget, leading to a more stable budget with consistent revenue that your agency can depend on from year to year.

This workshop will discuss different funding streams available to supervised visitation programs - federal funds, state funds, local government funds, foundation grants, corporate donations, individual donors, fees for service, in-kind donations, and other funding streams. Pros and cons of each funding source will be discussed and participants will identify which funding sources would help achieve a balanced income stream for the nonprofit or how to build towards it.

Bradley A Wood has over 20 years experience in the nonprofit field, including serving in leadership positions for multiple organizations. Mr. Wood has been with Central Visitation Program since August 2014. Previously Mr. Wood was one of the Principals with Colorado Impact, a nonprofit organization working to engage the community in making necessary policy changes. Mr. Wood served as the Principal for Business Development and Operations, working on fundraising, internal operations and policy development. Before this Mr. Wood served the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America as the Director for Lutheran Advocacy Ministry -Colorado, working directly with the Bishop on matters of policy pertaining to low-income and marginalized communities and assisting with community relations. Mr. Wood spent almost 7 years working with Metro CareRing, a local food pantry and emergency assistance provider, specializing in marketing, fundraising, volunteer management and training, staff/intern supervision and advocacy.

Building Resilience in Supervised Visitation Programs

The science of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) and trauma informed care has given us the opportunity not only to strive to prevent childhood trauma, but also to recognize the forces that come into play when the families we serve struggle with multiple behavioral challenges. Both parents and children may appear more guarded and anxious or emotionally reactive. These behaviors are not character faults, but are reasonable reactions to life experiences. Supervised visitation providers and others in the community can help family members become more resilient by providing a supportive, strength based program. Resilience occurs in context. Environments have to be safe and differences have to be recognized and not stigmatized. Providers, parents and children can learn to see themselves through their strengths, not their weaknesses. This workshop will cover the newest research on the science of trauma and resilience and offer concrete strategies for supervised visitation programs to implement to support staff, parents and children in developing resilience. Additional information on developing community collaborations around ACES, trauma informed care and resilience will be offered

Grace Harris is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and also has a Master's Degree in Public Administration. She has combined these skills to advocate for programs that reduce the risks of child maltreatment. As the Parent Resources Director at California Parenting Institute, she supervises a multicultural staff that provides parenting support for families experiencing many challenges including mental illness, substance abuse, homelessness and language barriers. Grace is an appointed member of the Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Advisory Board and is a founding member of the PeriNatal Mental Health Partnership in Sonoma County, California. She is currently participating in a Master Trainers Program in ACES and Resiliency. She is excited to help others understand how developmental trauma can effect behavior and health outcomes as well as how resilience building activities can help to improve these outcomes for individuals, families and communities.

Recognizing the Intersection of Domestic Violence and Stalking in Supervised Visitation

Victims of domestic violence are often stalked by their partners both during and after a relationship ends. Recognizing stalking behaviors, including tactics that involve technology, is an essential element for enhancing safety in supervised visitation centers. Intimate partner stalkers pose the highest risk of both lethal and nonlethal harm to victims and their children. Intimate partner stalkers are more likely to: physically approach the victim, interfere with or threaten the victim, use weapons, and re-offend. This session will focus on the intersection of domestic violence and stalking, including tactics that involve the use of technology. This session will also identify how to plan for safety both onsite as well additional resources that can assist victims of intimate partner stalking and their children.

Jennifer Landaus has been an advocate and educator on the issues of stalking, domestic violence, and sexual assault for 19 years. Jennifer is a consultant with the Stalking Resource Center of the National Center for Victims of Crime where she provides training and technical assistance to enhance the ability of professionals, organizations, and systems to effectively respond to stalking. Jennifer is also the Director of Social Change at the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence, where she oversees state-level multi- disciplinary collaboratives including the Idaho Coordinated Response to Sexual & Domestic Violence and the Idaho Victims Assistance Academy. Jennifer has her Masters of Science degree in Criminal Justice from University of Cincinnati and is an adjunct professor at Boise State.

Creativity and Connection: The Arts in Supervised Visitation

Child Parent Institute embraces the use of the creative arts in addressing trauma and strengthening the health of children and families. Our trauma informed approach and the accessible and inviting nature of a shared creative focus helps families identify and use their strengths to discover new ways to address challenges and grow individually and as a unit. Participating in the arts promotes individual and family resilience, and develops communication and coping skills that increase family functioning. Explore how integrating simple art projects and creative activities in supervised visitation can help engage families, deepen parents' understanding of their children, and promote social and emotional growth and healing..

David Magallon is the Supervised Visitation Coordinator at the Child Parent Institute in Santa Rosa, CA. He supervises and trains a multicultural staff to deliver visits on site and in the community in a trauma informed manner. Additionally, he supervises and supports AmeriCorps members in providing visitation and education services to families. The supervised visitation program at CPI serves both families involved in the child welfare system and families who have been court referred. David has done previous presentations at the SVN Conference, speaks locally about parenting, and works with probation and re-entry clients.

Victims of Domestic Violence as Parents

This workshop will explore how many battering parents attempt to damage the children's relationship with the victim of domestic violence as a tactic to maintain power and control, the impact on children and victims, and how visitation centers can support victims in maintaining relationships with their children. The workshop will also offer an overview of protective parenting, what that might look like within the supervised visitation center setting, and distinguish between the reality of protective parenting and the false notion of parental alienation syndrome.

Jannette Brickman has been involved in domestic violence policy, reform, or direct service since 1992. She joined Vera in October 2010 as a Senior Program Associate for the Supervised Visitation Initiative, which provides training and technical assistance for the national Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program. Ms. Brickman works with dozens of communities around the country assisting them in their development and implementation of supervised visitation centers. Prior to joining Vera, Ms. Brickman served as a systems advocate for the Arizona Coalition Against Domestic Violence and as the Executive Director of the St. Louis Family Violence Council, which ran the St. Louis Family Justice Center. Ms. Brickman was also a staff and senior attorney at the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Family Violence Department. Ms. Brickman received her JD from DePaul University College of Law, and is licensed (inactive) in Illinois and (active) Colorado. She received her MA in Counseling from John Carroll University, and her BS in Journalism from Boston University..

Anneliese Brown has been working to address domestic and sexual violence for over 10 years. She currently serves as a senior program associate for the Vera Institute of Justice's Center on Victimization and Safety. As a member of the Accessing Safety Initiative team, she works closely with collaborations striving to improve services to victims of domestic and/or sexual violence who have disabilities or are Deaf. She's also a member of the Supervised Visitation Initiative team, and in this role has supported over 30 communities seeking to create or enhance visitation and exchange services that address the unique safety needs of victims of domestic violence and their children. Anneliese has over 8 years of experience providing technical assistance and training to communities receiving funding through the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), both through her work at the Vera Institute of Justice and as a former employee of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, where she oversaw the development of the Guiding Principles for OVW's former Supervised Visitation Grant Program. Anneliese has a bachelor's degree in women's studies and psychology from Bates College in Maine.

Supervised access in Collaboration with Familes and Community Patrners

"Promoting a seamless coordinated system of care that puts children, youth and families first." Brayden Supervision Services in Ontario, Canada offers several options to families requiring support for their custody and access needs. Children and youth in supervised visitation often have witnessed or have survived domestic violence within their families. The issues stemming from familial issues require seamless coordination of services between children's welfare, youth justice system, mental health agencies and family law, to name a few.

Debbie Sliwinski is a certified Child and Youth Counselor, with over forty years experience; her particular focus is in the areas of children's mental health, child welfare, and trauma. Debbie has worked on child and youth psychiatric units; she has managed a children's mental health residence, day treatment and a community mental health program for transitional-aged youth with major mental illness. Debbie has been a part-time faculty at Centennial College for over twenty years and provides consultation and support to families around children's mental health issues. She has done trainings for Safeguard's and presented at many national and international conferences. Debbie has been an accreditation site reviewer for Children's Mental Health Ontario since 2008. For a number of years Debbie held the executive director position for Ontario Association of Child and Youth Counsellors. Her mandate was to promote community partnerships with the goal of obtaining legislative status

Lynda Evans has seventeen years of experience working with children, adolescents and their families in mental health programs that focus on assisting individuals gain control over their behaviour. Lynda attended York University and graduated with a degree in psychology. She has also provided services as a private practitioner in a number of settings and in community based contracts. She brings an exceptional professional manner in dealing with client, family members and with community organizations in social service, education, youth justice and health care.

Two Research Studies: Supervised Visitation and the Custodial Parent

The purpose of this presentation is to report the results of two research studies conducted on the custodial parent and supervised visitation. Yevonne Baran from the University of Holy Cross in New Orleans, Louisiana will describe her qualitative research results regarding the custodial parent within therapeutic supervised visitation. Normajean Cefarelli from Northcentral University in Prescott Valley, Arizona will describe her mixed methods research results regarding the custodial parent within supervised visitation. This will help administrative staff and visitation monitors better serve the families court-ordered to their programs. It will additionally assist judges, attorneys, and collaborative partners in gaining a better understanding about ways to identify and support the custodial parent's role with various models of supervised visitation. This presentation will clarify an important part of the supervised visitation process with the family and can lead to improved program policies and procedures.

Yevonne M. Baran is a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist (LMFT-S), Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC-S), National Certified Counselor (NCC), and Board Approved Supervisor for both licenses. She has earned a Bachelor's Degree, Magna Cum Laude, in Community Mental Health from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and a Masters Degree in Human Services Counseling from the University of New Orleans. She has obtained additional education as a Trained Domestic Mediator and Qualified Parenting Coordinator. Yevonne is a veteran of the United States Air Force where she earned a diploma in Public Health from the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine and was awarded the Air Force Achievement Medal for Meritorious Service. She has additional experience with the military as a Civilian Clinical Counselor for the United States Navy. Currently Yevonne is finishing a doctorate (Ph.D.) in Counselor Education and Supervision with a specialization in Marriage & Family Therapy from the University of Holy Cross in New Orleans, Louisiana. She expects to graduate in May 2017. Her dissertation research involved custodial parents and therapeutic supervised visitation. She recently served as the Program Director and Clinical Supervisor of the Pilot Therapeutic Supervised Visitation Program at the University of Holy Cross after developing the program. Yevonne works in her own private practice in Slidell, Louisiana where she offers Therapy, Clinical Supervision, Parenting Coordination, and Visitation Supervision.

Normajean Cefarelli, LMFT is a Connecticut and New York State Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist who has trained extensively in counseling individuals, couples and families. I hold a Master of Family Therapy degree from Southern Connecticut State University (SCSU) and I am a Clinical Member and Approved Supervisor with the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) as well as a member of the state chapter of that organization. I served a three year term as a board member for the Connecticut Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (CTAMFT) in the role of Ethics Committee Liaison. I have conducted therapeutic supervised visits while integrating a Structural model for parenting. I have a strong passion for experiential therapies such as a Gestalt Therapy and Equine Assisted Psychotherapy. In addition to my demanding schedule, I chose to continue with my education and I am in the process of pursuing my Ph.D. in marriage and family therapy in order to deepen my knowledge of the field with the intention of teaching and supervising students. I am currently a Doctoral Candidate working on my dissertation.

The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study and Implications for Traumatized Parents and Children in Child Welfare

In this workshop we will learn about the ACE study and how ACEs are linked to poor physical and mental health, substance abuse, contact with the justice system, learning challenges and difficulty maintaining employment and relationships. We will learn what to look for to determine attachment and trauma histories and change how we relate to people in a way that diffuses their fears so they are more open to partnering with helpers.

Melinda Charles is founder of the San Antonio Center for Childhood Trauma and Attachment and provides a wealth of training resources for child welfare workers. She addresses the impact of trauma in out-of-home care, adoptive placement and school settings.

"QuickStart": A New Integrated Supervised Visitation Parent Education Program

"QuickStart" is a new court-community supervised visitation parent education program developed to assist court-ordered noncustodial (the parent ordered to supervised visitation) and custodial parents (the parent with whom the child resides with) in understanding the supervised visitation and exchange service process. The goal of the supervised visitation parent education program is to inform parents about supervised visitation and/or exchange services, including understanding what supervised visitation is; how [a] supervised visitation program operates; the role and duties of the visitation provider; (for the state of California this would include Standard 5.20 requirements); parental responsibilities during visitation and compliance with court order; and tips for maximizing safety and parent-child contact. Quickstart is designed to support parents with an educational resource. Parents are invited to complete the Quick Start program befo re seeking any visitation service and parents must complete the program before the supervised visitation agency /provider will accept the case and/or court referral for service delivery.

Shelly La Botte, J.D., is the Access to Visitation Grant Coordinator for the State of California. She is responsible for managing the state (federal funding) grant program, which supports funding to the superior courts (approximately 26 of the 58 counties) to facilitate and increase noncustodial parents' access to and visitation with their children through the grant-related activities of supervised visitation and exchange services, parent education, and group counseling services for parents and children going through separation and divorce in family court. Ms. La Botte has made numerous presentations on the topics of grant management, supervised visitation and safe exchange services, and domestic violence. She also works on various public policy initiatives and assists with the development of statewide standards of practice for court-based best practices and Rules of Court related to supervised visitation and domestic violence services. Ms. La Botte holds a Juris Doctorate degree with more than twenty years of experience in the California court system with an expertise in public policy development, project administration and management, grant supervision, and technical assistance to the superior courts statewide.

Jenni Middleton. M.S., after retirement from twenty years in the fire service Ms. Middleton began work in social services. She completed her Masters in Marriage and Family therapy, worked as an MFTI for two years in foster care counseling and supervising visits with Northern Valley Catholic Social Services. She has been the Executive Director of Northern California Center for Family Awareness, Kids' Turn Shasta-Cascade since 1997. Ms. Middleton has worked closely with the Superior Court of Shasta County, Family Court on the Access to Visitation grant program for over 15 years coordinating supervised visitation services throughout the county region and educational resources.

What Kids Want You to Know

Presentation to address the key components when interviewing children for forensic purposes. The presenter will oversee a general discussion of themes that he has seen in the over 3,000 child interviews he has conducted in the last 15 years. Children as problem solvers: what children want judges, parents, and court professionals to know about their experience of divorce and other changes of access.

Tony Neugebauer has been the Bexar County Domestic Relations Office Director for 14 years. He was previously the Clinical Director, Adjunct Professor, and Faculty at Our Lady of the Lake University for 18 years. His clinical specialty involves child custody evaluations, forensic interviews, and therapy with court-involved clients.

A Child Centric Approach After Divorce in Multicultural Singapore

We will be presenting the service model for our supervised exchange and supervised visitation programme (SESV) in Singapore. We have a continuum of divorce support services for divorcing families in Singapore. These slew of programmes and services cater to cases that are heard in both the civil -Family Justice Courts and the Syariah courts (Muslim Families) which are referred to our four Divorce Support Specialist Agencies. In addition, we worked closely with the Office of Chief Psychologist to develop a decision making matrix to help determine what levels of therapeutic interventions can be emplaced to ensure efficacy in good outcome for the families. This matrix is based on four variables: Child Safety, Parent-Child Interaction, Relationships between Parent and Child Functioning. This assessment tool helps the caseworkers to arrive at an informed decision. It is also specially formulated for the SESV programme. We are also doing concurrent evaluation and research to validate the tool for reliability

Vivienne Ngis Chief Psychologist/Director, Family Education and Support, Family Development Group Ministry of Social and Family Development

Cheh Hoon is Assistant Director, Family Education and Support, Family Development Group Ministry of Social and Family Development

Pre Conference

Quantifying your Program's Value: How to use the Protective Factors Study for funding and recognition

Wednesday, May 31, 2017
1:00 PM- 3:30 PM
Cost $60 per person

Why do some communities -- but not others -- value supervised visitation (SV) ? How do we overcome the stakeholder misunderstandings about our work? How do we used research-based knowledge to attract funders? This session provides participants with all of the tools and research on the Clearinghouse on Supervised Visitation Protective Factor Study. Using the framework of this new study, we will answer those questions and teach participants how to quantify their work with families.

This is a 2.5 hour session that includes group work, interactive discussion, and case-specific examples. All participants will receive a Certificate of Completion from the Clearinghouse on Supervised Visitation, as well as a full set of surveys, tools, and modifiable instruments.

Participants will learn:

  • Why supervised visitation is devalued by those who misunderstand it
  • How Protective Factor research is grounded in science
  • How to translate what you are already doing into a quantifiable practice<'li>
  • Why the Protective Factor Research can be key to quantifying crucial SV interaction with families
  • How to use and modify Clearinghouse tools such as parent surveys and questionnaires to show "doses" of intervention
  • How to communicate your Protective Factor Work to funders.
Karen Oehme is the Director of the Institute for Family Violence Studies at Florida State University's (FSU) College of Social Work and a Distinguished University Scholar. The Institute houses several large multi-disciplinary projects including the Law Enforcement Families Partnership, the Clearinghouse on Supervised Visitation, and the Medical Professionals Partnership. She builds popular, online trainings and resource sites for child protective agencies, social service providers, medical professionals, judges, and criminal justice agencies throughout the U.S. Oehme has written and co-authored many scholarly articles about issues relating to families and interpersonal violence.

Post Conference Workshops: New Program Development

This year we are offering two FREE Bonus workshops geared around new program development, one with a focus on Child Welfare programs, and one with a focus on Policy Development for programs working with cases involving Domestic Violence

Saturday, June 3, 2017
9:00 AM- 12:00 PM
Cost: Free with Conference Registration

Session 1: Establishing SV Services to Benefit Families in Child Welfare

The Northern Rhode Island Visitation Center (NVRIC) is the lead agency on a Rhode Island Foundation grant, which started in December of 2015, that focuses on several key aspects: collaboration amongst all visitation providers in the state; customization of the FAST information and integration tool; training and certification of all staff in the use of the FAST; the development of a web-based data collection and sharing program; practice-focused implementation of the FAST; evaluation of data; and quality improvement activities. We have implemented this model to improve the awareness of key stakeholders of needs and strengths of the families within the RI child welfare system who are involved in visitation programs, as well as the impact of visitation programs on improving outcomes for families seeking reunification. A primary goal of the project is for data to be utilized in ongoing quality and practice improvement activities at different levels of the programs both within individual programs and throughout the state. We will provide information related to our strategic objectives and process, the customized FAST tool, and a presentation of data gathered regarding family presenting demographics, individual and family needs and strengths, and ongoing quality improvement activities to date.

After receiving a Bachelor in Social Work from the State University of New York at Albany, Ivy Medeiros received her Master in Social Work from New York University in 1997. Her post-masters career has centered around the fields of child welfare and infant mental health. Throughout her time in a Preventive Services program in NY, the Family Preservation Program Manager and Child Welfare Manager at Community Care Alliance in RI, Mrs. Medeiros has gained extensive experience working with high risk families towards well-being, permanency and self-sufficiency. Mrs. Medeiros's passion for working with parents and young children led her to a post-Master's certificate in Infant Mental Health. Mrs. Medeiros has provided Supervision to students and staff for the past 18 years and currently fills the role of Adjunct Instructor at Rhode Island College, teaching Human Behavior, Diversity and Oppression. Due to her love for teaching, Mrs. Medeiros also provides a variety of educational workshops and training to professionals throughout her agency and community. Mrs. Medeiros is an independently licensed clinical social worker (LICSW) in the state of RI.

Deb Deragon began her career at Providence College receiving a Bachelor's of Arts in Public and Community Service in 2001. Deb received a master's in Social Work and Public Administration from West Virginia University in 2010. Deb moved back to Rhode Island after completing her degrees and continued work in child welfare. Deb worked for three years in the treatment foster care program at Community Care Alliance (formerly Family Resources Community Action) before moving into the Program Manager position at the Northern RI Visitation Center for the last five years. Deb has also obtained her independent clinical social work license and provides clinical supervision for staff and MSW interns.

Session 2: New Program Policy and Procedure Development that Accounts for Domestic Violence

This session will explore crafting polices and procedures at your program that account for the unique risks that are presented when working with cases involving domestic violence. Developing polices should never involve a cookie-cutting approach that simply replicates what other programs have implemented, since it is unlikely that these polices and procedures will reflect the work being done in your program and the critical issues in your community to adequately provide safety. This session will highlight how a comprehensive and collaborative approach will yield to safer and more effective services.

Jannette Brickman has been involved in domestic violence policy, reform, or direct service since 1992. She joined Vera in October 2010 as a Senior Program Associate for the Supervised Visitation Initiative, which provides training and technical assistance for the national Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program. Ms. Brickman works with dozens of communities around the country assisting them in their development and implementation of supervised visitation centers. Prior to joining Vera, Ms. Brickman served as a systems advocate for the Arizona Coalition Against Domestic Violence and as the Executive Director of the St. Louis Family Violence Council, which ran the St. Louis Family Justice Center. Ms. Brickman was also a staff and senior attorney at the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Family Violence Department. Ms. Brickman received her JD from DePaul University College of Law, and is licensed (inactive) in Illinois and (active) Colorado. She received her MA in Counseling from John Carroll University, and her BS in Journalism from Boston University..

Anneliese Brown has been working to address domestic and sexual violence for over 10 years. She currently serves as a senior program associate for the Vera Institute of Justice's Center on Victimization and Safety. As a member of the Accessing Safety Initiative team, she works closely with collaborations striving to improve services to victims of domestic and/or sexual violence who have disabilities or are Deaf. She's also a member of the Supervised Visitation Initiative team, and in this role has supported over 30 communities seeking to create or enhance visitation and exchange services that address the unique safety needs of victims of domestic violence and their children. Anneliese has over 8 years of experience providing technical assistance and training to communities receiving funding through the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), both through her work at the Vera Institute of Justice and as a former employee of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, where she oversaw the development of the Guiding Principles for OVW's former Supervised Visitation Grant Program. Anneliese has a bachelor's degree in women's studies and psychology from Bates College in Maine.